Recovering Medical Expenses After a Truck Accident

medical_billsPeople who survive collisions with commercial semi-trucks, buses, fuel tankers, or other large vehicles that weigh up to 80,000 pounds often incur significant medical bills. Initially, these expenses may be for the life-saving treatment they received in the emergency room and hospital immediately after the accident.

Additionally, some people require ongoing care for their crash-related injuries. When the medical bills start piling up, it can leave accident victims feeling helpless and unsure.

Fortunately, civil law provides a legal remedy for individuals who feel the burden of mounting medical debt. Large truck accident victims can file a personal injury lawsuit against the at-fault party to seek compensation for a wide range of damages, including the cost of past and future medical bills for injuries and conditions related to the crash.

While monetary awards are never guaranteed—even in seemingly open-and-shut cases—there are a few things an accident victim can do to strengthen the claim and make recovering medical expenses more likely.

Seek Immediate Medical Attention

After a truck accident, some people think that if they weren't seriously injured, they don't need to see a doctor. Not only is this idea false, but it can also put the success of any future insurance claim or lawsuit in real jeopardy. To avoid standing in the way of financial recovery, individuals involved in a large truck crash should see a doctor to have their conditions assessed and their injuries documented as soon as possible.

Seeking prompt medical care after a truck collision also allows doctors to catch and treat injuries that aren't immediately apparent, such as those masked by the post-accident adrenaline coursing through the body. Accident victims who delay medical treatment may face skepticism from insurance claims adjusters or the defendant's legal counsel if they have late-developing injuries.

When someone doesn't see a doctor after an accident, insurances adjusters incorrectly assume one of two things: the injury isn't as serious as claimed, or that it was caused by something other than the crash in question.

Keep Copies of Your Medical Bills and Records

Once the medical bills start pouring in, it's important to keep them neat and organized so a truck accident attorney can use them as evidence. Individuals should also save all medical records provided by a doctor, as well as receipts for out-of-pocket expenses, such as:

  • Lab and diagnostic tests
  • Over-the-counter and prescription medication
  • Adaptive equipment like canes, crutches, and wheelchairs

In addition, an attorney can request much of this information from the doctor directly.

Take Advantage of Expert Witnesses

Personal injury attorneys may secure testimony from expert witnesses who can speak to the severity of a victim's injuries, the prognosis, and how these injuries may affect everyday tasks such concentrating, and comprehending and following directions. Other expert witnesses can also provide information on factors like the estimated cost of required care.

Consult an Attorney Before Discussing the Case With an Insurance Company

After a truck accident, insurance companies want to take statements as soon as possible—often while the victim is still at the scene of the crash. While providing this statement may seem harmless, doing so can have harmful repercussions. For example, if a victim reflexively apologizes for his or her involvement in an accident, the insurance company might consider that an admission of fault and use it to reduce its financial obligation to the victim, or as a justification for denying the claim altogether.

Do You Need a Truck Accident Attorney?

If you or a loved one was seriously injured in a truck accident, you may be counting on a financial recovery to help pay for medical treatments. The award-winning truck accident attorneys with McGartland Law can help you fight for compensation for medical expenses and other damages. Contact McGartland Law today to schedule a no-cost, no-obligation analysis of your case.