Valsartan Contamination Caused Liver Cancer

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A new valsartan contamination lawsuit alleges that the recalled blood pressure medication caused a woman to develop liver cancer from the carcinogenic impurities.

Karen Brackman filed the complaint April 10 in the District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee. She names Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceutical, Solco Healthcare and Prinston Pharmaceutical as defendants.

According to her lawsuit, Brackman received her liver cancer diagnosis in April 2018. Liver cancer is one of numerous malignancies that the valsartan contamination can cause. Namely, the chemicals N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) in the pills are to blame.

Brackman indicates that the drug manufacturers were aware of the valsartan contamination and concealed it. She alleges that she would not have exposed herself to these sorts of risks if she knew of them.

“Plaintiff would not have consented to taking valsartan, had Plaintiff known of or been fully and adequately informed by Defendants of the true increased risks and serious dangers of taking the drug, which was rendered unreasonably dangerous by the presence of NDMA and/or NDEA,” the lawsuit states. “Plaintiff and Plaintiff’s physicians chose to take and prescribe valsartan based on the risks and benefits disclosed to them by Defendants but would have made a difference choice, had the true risks and benefits been provided.”

Brackman is seeking compensatory and punitive damages for failure to warn, negligent misrepresentation, negligence, design defect, manufacturing defect, and breach of consumer protection statutes.

Brackman joins a growing number of individuals filing valsartan contamination lawsuits after developing liver, kidney, bladder and gastric cancers, as well as other injuries after exposure to the defective drugs.

There are also multiple valsartan class action claims from individuals who have not developed cancer but are seeing reimbursement for the worthless and dangerous drugs. This also includes funding for medical monitoring they may require for the rest of their lives due to cancer-causing agent exposure.